ZEST FOR LIFE
Zest for life. Art and TV - no it isn't a conflict. Music and pictures.
Most of my pics aren't my pics, unfortunately. I'm just a collector.
ZEST FOR LIFE
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samwolfeconnelly:

‘Stargazer’
Sam Wolfe Connelly
13 new pieces for my show ‘Nocturne’ opening Friday, Feb 8th at Roq La Rue in Seattle, WA
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afroui:

Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis

Angels (Paradise)
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nvs-a:

Odd Nerdrum
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pixography:

Denis Nunez Rodriguez
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asylum-art:

Anna Gillespie’s Resourceful Sculptures of the Human Figure
British sculptor Anna Gillespie uses the body as a template, creating human figures that appear to be subsumed in the material from which they are made. Ranging from small-scale to life-size, Gillespie’s sculptures emerge from conventional materials like bronze and plaster and, sometimes, more resourceful items such as acorns and beech nuts. Her figures appear prone to the elements. Some appear to be blown away by the wind or covered creeping plant life as if they have become part of nature, returning to their origin. Take a look at some of her work below, images courtesy of Anna Gillespie.
asylum-art:

Anna Gillespie’s Resourceful Sculptures of the Human Figure
British sculptor Anna Gillespie uses the body as a template, creating human figures that appear to be subsumed in the material from which they are made. Ranging from small-scale to life-size, Gillespie’s sculptures emerge from conventional materials like bronze and plaster and, sometimes, more resourceful items such as acorns and beech nuts. Her figures appear prone to the elements. Some appear to be blown away by the wind or covered creeping plant life as if they have become part of nature, returning to their origin. Take a look at some of her work below, images courtesy of Anna Gillespie.
asylum-art:

Anna Gillespie’s Resourceful Sculptures of the Human Figure
British sculptor Anna Gillespie uses the body as a template, creating human figures that appear to be subsumed in the material from which they are made. Ranging from small-scale to life-size, Gillespie’s sculptures emerge from conventional materials like bronze and plaster and, sometimes, more resourceful items such as acorns and beech nuts. Her figures appear prone to the elements. Some appear to be blown away by the wind or covered creeping plant life as if they have become part of nature, returning to their origin. Take a look at some of her work below, images courtesy of Anna Gillespie.
asylum-art:

Anna Gillespie’s Resourceful Sculptures of the Human Figure
British sculptor Anna Gillespie uses the body as a template, creating human figures that appear to be subsumed in the material from which they are made. Ranging from small-scale to life-size, Gillespie’s sculptures emerge from conventional materials like bronze and plaster and, sometimes, more resourceful items such as acorns and beech nuts. Her figures appear prone to the elements. Some appear to be blown away by the wind or covered creeping plant life as if they have become part of nature, returning to their origin. Take a look at some of her work below, images courtesy of Anna Gillespie.
asylum-art:

Anna Gillespie’s Resourceful Sculptures of the Human Figure
British sculptor Anna Gillespie uses the body as a template, creating human figures that appear to be subsumed in the material from which they are made. Ranging from small-scale to life-size, Gillespie’s sculptures emerge from conventional materials like bronze and plaster and, sometimes, more resourceful items such as acorns and beech nuts. Her figures appear prone to the elements. Some appear to be blown away by the wind or covered creeping plant life as if they have become part of nature, returning to their origin. Take a look at some of her work below, images courtesy of Anna Gillespie.
asylum-art:

Anna Gillespie’s Resourceful Sculptures of the Human Figure
British sculptor Anna Gillespie uses the body as a template, creating human figures that appear to be subsumed in the material from which they are made. Ranging from small-scale to life-size, Gillespie’s sculptures emerge from conventional materials like bronze and plaster and, sometimes, more resourceful items such as acorns and beech nuts. Her figures appear prone to the elements. Some appear to be blown away by the wind or covered creeping plant life as if they have become part of nature, returning to their origin. Take a look at some of her work below, images courtesy of Anna Gillespie.
asylum-art:

Anna Gillespie’s Resourceful Sculptures of the Human Figure
British sculptor Anna Gillespie uses the body as a template, creating human figures that appear to be subsumed in the material from which they are made. Ranging from small-scale to life-size, Gillespie’s sculptures emerge from conventional materials like bronze and plaster and, sometimes, more resourceful items such as acorns and beech nuts. Her figures appear prone to the elements. Some appear to be blown away by the wind or covered creeping plant life as if they have become part of nature, returning to their origin. Take a look at some of her work below, images courtesy of Anna Gillespie.
asylum-art:

Anna Gillespie’s Resourceful Sculptures of the Human Figure
British sculptor Anna Gillespie uses the body as a template, creating human figures that appear to be subsumed in the material from which they are made. Ranging from small-scale to life-size, Gillespie’s sculptures emerge from conventional materials like bronze and plaster and, sometimes, more resourceful items such as acorns and beech nuts. Her figures appear prone to the elements. Some appear to be blown away by the wind or covered creeping plant life as if they have become part of nature, returning to their origin. Take a look at some of her work below, images courtesy of Anna Gillespie.
asylum-art:

Anna Gillespie’s Resourceful Sculptures of the Human Figure
British sculptor Anna Gillespie uses the body as a template, creating human figures that appear to be subsumed in the material from which they are made. Ranging from small-scale to life-size, Gillespie’s sculptures emerge from conventional materials like bronze and plaster and, sometimes, more resourceful items such as acorns and beech nuts. Her figures appear prone to the elements. Some appear to be blown away by the wind or covered creeping plant life as if they have become part of nature, returning to their origin. Take a look at some of her work below, images courtesy of Anna Gillespie.
asylum-art:

Anna Gillespie’s Resourceful Sculptures of the Human Figure
British sculptor Anna Gillespie uses the body as a template, creating human figures that appear to be subsumed in the material from which they are made. Ranging from small-scale to life-size, Gillespie’s sculptures emerge from conventional materials like bronze and plaster and, sometimes, more resourceful items such as acorns and beech nuts. Her figures appear prone to the elements. Some appear to be blown away by the wind or covered creeping plant life as if they have become part of nature, returning to their origin. Take a look at some of her work below, images courtesy of Anna Gillespie.
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pixography:

Sandra Yagi
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theantidote: Ryan Michael
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lapitiedangereuse:

David Bowie byHelmut Newton